For the Love of Trees – Poetic Snippets and Quotes

Compiled by Cindy Carpenter, January 17, 2020

  •  White Pine: graceful growth; appearance in the wind- “….swift and enchanting changes of light against masses of bluish green.”- Loundsberry
  • “And there’s never a leaf nor a blade too mean to be some happy creature’s palace.” –Lowell
  • Cells- lakes of life (Flowering Earth- Donald Culross Peattie)
  • Carbon- the keystone atom in every molecule of living tissue (Peattie)
  • Chloroplasts are tiny jewel boxes holding sun-catching pigments. -re-phrased from David George Haskell, The Forest Unseen
  • “Like a lot of us humans it takes age and maturity to sweeten a persimmon.
    When its skin gets wrinkled and it begins to look saggy, then it’s in its prime…”
    (Doug Elliot e-newsletter)
  • “The great winter buds of the Shagbark hickory open like flowers in May.” – Julia
    Ellen Rogers, Trees Worth Knowing
  • Oaks – a family of cup bearers (scaly acorns, Trees Worth Knowing- Julia Ellen
    Rogers)
  • The Scarlet oak is like a flaming torch set among the dull browns and yellows in
    our autumnal woods. (Rogers)
  • Bur oak (mossy-cup oak) acorns suggest dainty birds’ nests
  • Sourwood flowers on the ground look like teeth (suggested by a child to Cindy
    Carpenter)
  • “If you have joy, take it to the trees: there it will be chastened and heightened. If
    you have a grief, take it to the trees: there it will be chastened and relieved.” –
    from a 1954 paper by Dr. Carl Alwin Schenck, Goethe und der Baum in which he
    considers the saying an old rule.
  • “The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green
    thing which stands in the way.” –William Blake
  • “For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, and that
    the tender branch thereof will not cease.”- Job 14:7.
  • “…drink in the beauty and wonder at the beauty of what you see.” – Rachel
    Carson
  • “…we don’t see the roots. We just see and enjoy the beauty. In much the same
    way, what goes on inside of us is like the roots of a tree.” – Joyce Meyer
  • “Trees are the earth’s endless effort to speak to the listening heaven.” –
    Rabindranath Tagore
  • “Trees are your best antiques.” – Alexander Smith
  • “Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come.” – Chinese
    Proverb
  • “A tree falls the way it leans.” – Bulgarian proverb
  • “Between every two Pine trees there is a door leading to a new way of life.” – John
    Muir
  • “For a tree to become tall it must grow tough roots among the rocks.” – Friedrich
    Nietzsche
  • “Once there was a tree, and she loved a little boy.” – Shel Silverstein
  • “A tree against the sky possesses the same interest, the same character, the same
    expression as the figure of a human.” – Georges Rouault
  • “We can learn a lot from trees: they’re always grounded but never stop reaching
    heavenward.” – Everett Mamor
  • “Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we
    think of it; the tree is the real thing.” – Abraham Lincoln
  • “We can grow up with trees and see them change with us.” – Bernd Heinrich, The
    Trees in My Forest
  • “Planting a seed is like planting a part of ourselves.”-Heinrich
  • “An old tree is an island of life in all seasons.” –Heinrich
  • “A tree practices priorities.” – Heinrich
  • Airborne acorn dispersers like blue jays give oak trees legs of life. Cindy
    Carpenter, inspired by Heinrich’s The Trees in My Forest
  • A tree’s delicate root system is full of surprises.
  • “Trees are motherships of biodiversity.” – Peter Wohlleben, The Hidden Life of
    Trees
  • “Centuries of experience are stored in an old tree’s roots.” – Wohlleben
  • “Trees live their lives in the slow lane.”- Wohlleben
  • “Like a human social security system that ensures individuals don’t fall behind,
    trees’ well-being depends on their community.”- Wohlleben
  • When we hold an object made of wood, we are holding what has spent years
    outside, experiencing the environment in its own unique way. Cindy Carpenter,
    inspired by reading The Hidden Life of Trees
  • “Just breathe among the trees and you’ll know you belong.” Billy B.
  • New life is nurtured by an old log.
  • “He that plants trees, loves others besides himself.” – Thomas Fuller
  • “Every tree has little intimate signs that point the way to discoveries of the spirit,
    of art, of mechanics, of astonishment at natural miracles, and of reassurance
    about life itself in a violent world.” – from A Pocket Guide to Trees: How to Identify
    and Enjoy Them, by Rutherford Platt
  • Trees are towering examples of nature’s bliss and usefulness. – a theme from
    April Welch, Active Learning Exercise in theme development
  • “Strange that so few ever come to the woods to see how the pine lives and grows
    and spires, lifting its evergreen arms to the light- to see its perfect success.” –
    Henry David Thoreau
  • “Except during the nine months before he draws his first breath, no man
    manages his affairs as well as a tree does.” –George Bernard Shaw
  • “I like trees because they seem more designed to the way they have to live than
    other things do.” –Willa Cather
  • “So it’s not like the trees are in the environment; it’s like the trees are the
    environment.” – from Teaching the Trees by Joan Maloof
  • “The nature-lover is not looking for mere facts, but for meanings, for something
    he can translate into the terms of his own life.” – John Burroughs, The Gospel of Nature
Posted in Indoor Meeting | Leave a comment

The Trillium erectum Species Complex of the Southern Appalachians. Katherine G. Mathews, PhD – November 8, 2019

Friday, November 8 – The Trillium erectum species complex of the Southern Appalachians
Presenter: Katherine G. Mathews, PhD,,  Associate Professor of Biology & Director of the Herbarium, Western Carolina University

Kathy’s presentation covered the distinctive characteristics of six Trillium species native to the Southern Appalachian region and then focused on three taxa, Trillium erectum var. erectum (red-flowered), T. rugelii, (white-flowered), and T. erectum var. album (white-flowered) and their putative hybrids. More information can be found in Christina Pampkin Stoehrel’s thesis.

A link to the Herbarium can be found here.

Ten Things to Know about Trilliums

Kathy has given us permission to post her talk, which you can access here:

Trillium erectum species complex of the Southern Appalachians

Posted in Indoor Meeting, Plant ID | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

McCall Cemetery Loop – October 25, 2019

Photography by Ken Borgfeldt, Penny Longhurst, & Harriet Walls. Click on any picture to zoom and view the slide show

Posted in Field Trips | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bad Creek to the Whitewater River – October 18, 2019

Information about the construction and operation of the Lake Jocassee Pumped Storage Facility can be found here.

Photography by Ken Borgfeldt and Penny Longhurst. Click on any picture to zoom.

Posted in Field Trips | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Holmes Educational State Forest, Upper Loop – October 11, 2019

Holmes Trail Map

Photography by Ken Borgfeldt &  Penny Longhurst. Click on any picture to zoom and view the slide show.

 

Posted in Field Trips | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Jones Farm – October 4, 2019

Thanks, Betty for a great visit! Photography by Ken Borgfeldt & Penny Longhurst. (Click on any picture to zoom & enter the slide show).

Posted in Field Trips | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mt. Hardy Trail – September 27, 2019

Photography by Ken Borgfeldt & Joe Standaert. (Click on any picture to zoom & enter the slide show)

Posted in Field Trips | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ashmore Heritage Preserve – September 20, 2019

Photography by Ken Borgfeldt. (Click on any picture to zoom)

Posted in Field Trips | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sam Knob Meadow – September 13, 2019

Photography by Ken Borgfeldt,  Penny Longhurst,  Jim Poling, & Joe Standaert. Click on any picture to zoom & enter the slide show.

Posted in Field Trips | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Purchase Knob – September 6, 2019

From the NPS website: The Appalachian Highland Science Learning Center is based on 535 acres in Haywood County, North Carolina, contiguous with the rest of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The parcel includes the 5,086 foot elevation Purchase Knob, a historic cabin, and two buildings which contain offices, laboratory space, a 50-person classroom, and housing for up to eight visiting scientists.

The buildings and land were donated in 2000 by Kathryn McNeil and Voit Gilmore, who had owned the property since 1964, and had built a summer home upon it. This represents the largest donation of land since GSMNP came into existence. Since then, the park has averaged about 5,000 visiting scientists, students and teachers each year. Everyday, the staff and program participants thank the family for their generous gift.

In 2001, Purchase Knob became the home of one of five initial Learning Centers created by Congress to support research in the National Parks and to transmit the information generated to the public. Eventually, 32 learning centers are expected nationwide. To learn more about Purchase Knobs visit the NPS website.

Photography by Ken Borgfeldt, Daudie Colson, & Penny Longhurst

 

 

 

Posted in Field Trips | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment